Wonder Woofin: A Fridays with Franklin Preview of Coming Attractions

“Fridays with Franklin” is supposed to appear on Fridays. The clue is in the name. And today is Thursday.

But if I waited my turn, I wouldn’t have a chance to show you Rosamund’s Halloween costume before Halloween. So Makers’ Mercantile has graciously agreed to allow me to offer you this sneak peek.

In the pantheon of superheroes, there’s only one whose adventures I enjoyed as a child. The others bored me. Rosamund likes her, too; and is a princess, a protector, and a survivor in her own way.

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She’s my little princess, anyhow.

fwf-53-roz-ww-sweater-back
The yarn is HiKoo Simpliworsted, and in these pictures it has already been once through the washer and dryer. Good stuff, for things that need to be washed and dried frequently.

In the next two installments of “Fridays with Franklin,” I’ll tell you more about how this was designed and worked–including an in-depth tutorials on the duplicate stitch eagle, and the embroidery of those stars. I’m rather proud of the stars. I’m also proud of the fit across the butt. Rosamund has such a curvaceous posterior. She gets it from my side.

(By the way, if you’re tuning in for the first time, you can jump back to the first “Fridays with Franklin” to learn what this column’s all about.)

See you next Friday!

About Franklin

Designer, teacher, author and illustrator Franklin Habit is the author of It Itches: A Stash of Knitting Cartoons (Interweave Press, 2008). His newest book, I Dream of Yarn: A Knit and Crochet Coloring Book was brought out by Soho Publishing in May 2016 and is in its second printing.

He travels constantly to teach knitters at shops and guilds across the country and internationally; and has been a popular member of the faculties of such festivals as Vogue Knitting Live!, STITCHES Events, the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival, Squam Arts Workshops, the Taos Wool Festival, Sock Summit, and the Madrona Fiber Arts Winter Retreat.

Franklin’s varied experience in the fiber world includes contributions of writing and design to Vogue KnittingYarn Market News, Interweave KnitsInterweave CrochetPieceWorkTwist Collective; and a regular columns and cartoons for Mason-Dixon Knitting, PLY Magazine, Lion Brand Yarns, and Skacel Collection/Makers’ Mercantile. Many of his independently published designs are available via Ravelry.com.

He is the longtime proprietor of The Panopticon, one of the most popular knitting blogs on the Internet (presently on hiatus).

Franklin lives in Chicago, Illinois, cohabiting shamelessly with 15,000 books, a Schacht spinning wheel, four looms, and a colony of yarn that multiplies whenever his back is turned.

Follow Franklin online via Twitter (@franklinhabit), Instagram (@franklin.habit), his Web site (franklinhabit.com) or his Facebook page.

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Muffintop

fwf-logo-columnsizeFor an introduction to what goes on in this column, click here.

A few weeks ago, I came home to find a box from Makers’ Mercantile on the doorstep.

That’s one of the perks of this gig. I don’t have to go out and hunt for wild yarn with my net and spear. Yarn comes to me.

Usually it’s yarn I’ve asked for. But not this time. Not in this box.

No, in this box…

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was a Makers’ Mercantile sheep bowl

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…stuffed with…

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HiKoo Simplicity (DK weight, 55% Merino Wool, 28% Acrylic, 17% Nylon) in red (054 Vavava Voom), white (001 White), and blue (051 Raffi), along with…

399031_20170531154825

…one LOVaFUR Vegan Pompom, also in red, white, and blue.

At the bottom was a note suggesting that I take the contents (the yarn and pompom, that is–not the sheep bowl) and make them into something. A challenge. A dare!

I’m as patriotic as the next knitter, but those colors were a curveball. Red, white, and blue is a charged combination for lots of folks–not only Americans–and it’s not often associated with chilly weather. To me, it shouts fireworks, barbecues, and swimming pools.

I briefly considered crocheting a 1970s Yankee Doodle bikini,

fwf-52-bikini

but

a) HiKoo Simplicity streeeeeeeeeeetches when soaking wet, and
b) I couldn’t think of any place to stick the pompom that wouldn’t be either ridiculous or indecent.

With three skeins of wool blend and a pompom, clearly I ought to make a hat. Alrighty, then.

Swing Time

The pompom was the key. I have in my albums a few photographs of my mother in full 1960s regalia: Mary Quant knock-offs meant to give Detroit teenagers some of the verve and spark of swinging Londoners.

I saw that in the winter of 1969 she had gone to Niagara Falls in an oversized newsboy cap topped with just such a big, fluffy faux fur pompom. It perfectly matched her dressy short overcoat, with equally fluffy faux fur collar and cuffs.

The effect was goofy, but fun–an ensemble for a party girl who didn’t mind if her clothes shouted a bit.

There was my answer–let the pompom be the crowning touch on a hat that was boldly graphic, happy, even silly. A hat with some swing, in Union Jack colors. You can accessorize with red, white, and blue in the winter. Sure you can. James Bond did, while parachuting off a precipice in the Alps.

spywho-parachuste-xlarge
Still from The Spy Who Loved Me. © 2008 Danjaq, United Artists, CPII. 007 TM and related James Bond Trademarks, TM Danjaq.

It didn’t take long to realize that the effect I wanted didn’t come across in conventional, concentric stockinette stripes running ’round and ’round from the band to the crown. I’d seen that a million times. It wasn’t surprising enough to support the pompom.

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I toyed with a few other ideas, like an asymmetrical Mondrian-inspired take on stranded colorwork.

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That didn’t get far. It’s not a bad idea, though structurally it’s more suited to intarsia than stranding. I might come back to this one another time. But no matter what I did, in these colors I couldn’t get it to look anything other than an Uncle Sam hat gone horribly awry.

Over the Top

I’d ripped back to just the band for the fourth time when I thought about the garter stitch short rows in the cage purse. Those had been so much fun to knit. I could do the hat in garter stitch, right? No law against that. And I could also build it in successive short rows. Like this:

fwf-52-method

Each stripe would “eat up” two of the live stitches at the top of the band. The stripes would run across the top of the hat, instead of around the circumference. And there would be none of the usual decreases in the crown to interference with the progression of red, white, blue, red, white, blue.

Too Much of a Good Thing

Nothing gets me overexcited like trying out a new way to knit a familiar shape. I hate stopping to eat, or pee, or answer e-mails, or see people. I just want to go go go go go go until I find out whether it’s going to work or not.

I figured before I began that I’d need to increase in each stripe or the hat would be very short and fit like a teeny-weenie beanie. I planned the placement and rate of increases and zoomed along until in a gratifyingly short time the hat was almost off the needle. So I stuck it on my head.

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I think the stitch markers really add to the je ne sais quoi.

Oh, yeah. Fetching. Yeah.

Those two weird outcroppings at the right and left would have to go–or the whole idea would have to go.

The diagnosis? The bulges were the fault of the constant, violent increasing–clearly I needed to slow it down a bit. I’d been so worried about the hat being too small that I made it too big. Too big at each side. It sprouted saddlebags.

The next version, with increases tapering off about halfway through, was better.

fwf-52-secondproto
This better #@$!* work the second time, he thought.

I figured I could eliminate the remaining oddity in the shape with judicious blocking. HiKoo Simplicity is very malleable when wet.

As is my custom with any tam, I stretched the unblocked piece over a dinner plate.
Rather than soak it, I pulled out my steam iron and shot the top and (especially) the turned edge with jets and more jets of very hot steam, until everything except the band was quite damp. (If your iron doesn’t have a steam jet option, you can do this over a boiling tea kettle if you promise to be careful with your fingers.)

 

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Hover the hot iron near the fabric as you steam, but don’t touch the iron to the fabric.


I avoided steaming the band, because wet Simplicity stretches and a sopping wet band would have grown too large to fit properly. (Simplicity returns to its original dimensions after a spin in the tumble dryer–but then the entire hat would have come unblocked.)

Leaving the steamed hat on the plate, I set it aside to dry thoroughly overnight.

Drying things overnight is wonderful, because at some point exhaustion kicks in and I fall asleep and stop poking the piece every five minutes to see if it’s ready yet.

Crowning Touch

To find the exact center of the dry crown, I measured with the hat still on the plate and marked the spot with a locking ring stitch marker.

fwf-52-measuretop
I tied on the pompom. (LOVaFUR poms tie on, so you can change them out and move them around if you like.)

I called over a friend who has the perfect look for a hat like this.

I held my breath. I put it on her.

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I’m calling it a success.

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I’m calling it groovy, baby.

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I’m calling it…the Tricolor Muffin.

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Coming Up…

Wouldn’t you know it, the yarn for the next project arrived while this hat was in progress. And wouldn’t you know, it’s also heavy on red, white, and blue–though this time in HiKoo Simpliworsted and with the addition of gold.

When I opened the box, somehow Rosamund (whom you may remember from The Adventure of the Warm Puppy and More Excuses to Show You Pictures of My Adorable Dog) knew the contents were intended for her. Smart girl.

fwf-52-rozandyarn
Stop by in two weeks and I’ll show you what’s up.

In the meantime, we’ll be putting together a free pattern for the Tricolor Muffin. And if you don’t think you’re feeling quite up to the patriotic combo, we’ll have suggestions about other trios, other yarns, and other coordinating pompoms in the LOVaFUR line.

Tools and Materials Appearing in This Issue

HiKoo Simplicity (55% Merino Wool, 28% Acrylic, 17% Nylon. 117 yards per 50 gram hank)
Sheep Bowl (exclusive to Makers’ Mercantile!)
LOVaFUR Handmade Vegan Fur Pompom (shown in red/white/blue)
HiKoo Simpliworsted (55% Merino Wool, 25% Acrylic, 17% Nylon. 140 yards per 100 gram hank)
addi® Click Turbo Interchangeable Needle
Makers’ Mercantile Tape Measure (shown in Orange)

About Franklin

Designer, teacher, author and illustrator Franklin Habit is the author of It Itches: A Stash of Knitting Cartoons (Interweave Press, 2008). His newest book, I Dream of Yarn: A Knit and Crochet Coloring Book was brought out by Soho Publishing in May 2016 and is in its second printing.

He travels constantly to teach knitters at shops and guilds across the country and internationally; and has been a popular member of the faculties of such festivals as Vogue Knitting Live!, STITCHES Events, the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival, Squam Arts Workshops, the Taos Wool Festival, Sock Summit, and the Madrona Fiber Arts Winter Retreat.

Franklin’s varied experience in the fiber world includes contributions of writing and design to Vogue KnittingYarn Market News, Interweave KnitsInterweave CrochetPieceWorkTwist Collective; and a regular columns and cartoons for Mason-Dixon Knitting, PLY Magazine, Lion Brand Yarns, and Skacel Collection/Makers’ Mercantile. Many of his independently published designs are available via Ravelry.com.

He is the longtime proprietor of The Panopticon, one of the most popular knitting blogs on the Internet (presently on hiatus).

Franklin lives in Chicago, Illinois, cohabiting shamelessly with 15,000 books, a Schacht spinning wheel, four looms, and a colony of yarn that multiplies whenever his back is turned.

Follow Franklin online via Twitter (@franklinhabit), Instagram (@franklin.habit), his Web site (franklinhabit.com) or his Facebook page.

Craft Corner – Felted Acorns

I’ve tried to start this post with about a dozen different cheery “It’s fall y’all!!!” greetings, but as I write, it’s the first week in October, and there’s just a lot of bad news. Cee Cee and I have been talking about recent events, and it’s no surprise she likes hearing the survivor stories because they give her hope. As one way of dealing with this, she made a couple of bluebirds to give to friends. Our conversations have nudged me from worry, to feeling hopeless, to being hopeful. Cee Cee and I have found that connecting with friends to spread hope and joy around is contagious. And of course our favorite way to connect to joy,  is to create! So let me tell you what we’ve been up to.

We’re not what you’d call fancy people. In fact 97% of my phone’s photo album is full of images trying to avoid shots of our very outdated dining room wallpaper! Well, This month brings a project that helps our decor dilemma. Thanks to wool felted acorns, a couple of pumpkins and some gold paint we have a lovely Fall table centerpiece! Every time I walk past it, it makes me smile. We tried a few different techniques, including needle felting, wet felting, and artFelt® to make Cee Cee’s acorns. ArtFelt was definitely the most fun! We added a few drops of essential oil and now they smell good too. We created our “wooly” pumpkin by gluing roving to every other section of its orange little body. We were surprised how the colors matched perfectly. Cee Cee wants a whole field of wooly pumpkins!

CeeCeeacorns

October is also known for not only Halloween, but also for something called Black Cat Awareness Month. Cee Cee loves cats so of course she wants to celebrate it. She says there are stories about black cats being treated badly because of being associated with witchcraft. When I asked her where she learned this, she answered “in a cat magazine!”

Time for a little fact checking. We sat down at the computer and started searching for facts to support this statement, and learned that according to many sources, this is more of an urban legend than reality. (Cee Cee was relieved!) We did learn however, that black cats (in October and all year long) are less likely to be adopted, and spend more time in shelters. She made a sweet little black cat to remind people to be a little extra kind to our feline friends, and to consider adopting a black or tuxedo kitty next time you’re ready to grow your fur-family.

feltcat

She sketched out a simple cat and stitched him up in an afternoon. You can make your very own by getting the pattern on the Makers’ Mercantile website HERE. She’s including the pattern even though she thinks you should be brave and trust your own artistic abilities to sketch out your own cat pieces.

Find yourself a little joy this month and make something. Even better, make something and give it to someone else who needs a little joy. We’re busting out the knitting needles and turning lots of heels for a November project to help you get ready for the holidays.

Now for an exciting giveaway: This felt cat will get to come live with one of you! Cee Cee is giving him away….all you have to do is leave a comment in the blog (tell us what you love to make in the Fall) and we will choose a winner! Winner will be selected and announced in November’s Craft Corner post.

Have a wonderful month!!!

-BeLinda and Cee Cee

P.S. Don’t forget to leave us a comment!! Cee Cee can’t wait to find out who wins her little black cat!

Tools and Materials Appearing in This Issue

artFelt® Acorns

artFelt® paper
artFelt® tackboard
artFelt® needles
Makers’ Mercantile® Felter’s Wool (assorted colors)

Cee Cee’s Felt Cat

Black Felt
Scissors
Embroidery Floss

ABOUT 

CeeCee1Cee Cee Creech is growing up in a home full of creativity. Mom BeLinda loves making things, and Cee Cee loves it too. In 2011 Cee Cee changed their lives when she wanted to knit elephants to comfort the residents of Joplin, MO after a tornado destroyed their town.

This mom/daughter team has raised thousands of dollars, and made/distributed toys for charities all of the world. Today, Cee Cee is a high school student, curious maker, and the teen craft ambassador for Makers’ Mercantile. Follow their adventures on the Craft Corner.

All in the Wrist: A Handy Guide to Making and Giving Button Cuff Links

fwf-logo-v11For an introduction to what goes on in this column, click here.

I grew up in a family of Jewelry Guys. Guys like my grandfather. He wore dark, conservative suits to work; but at leisure, he treated each finger to a fat, gold ring and fastened thick ropes and chains of gold around his neck and wrists. The term “bling daddy” was not then in common usage, so my grandfather was described by Marv, his favorite jeweler, as being “a connoisseur of the finer men’s accessories.”

I inherited one of my grandfather’s signet rings. It’s a lump of solid gold with his initials engraved in a script so florid that it’s totally illegible. I never wear it. First, because my grandfather’s hands were so plump that this (a pinky ring) is too large to wear on my thumb. Second, it’s so heavy that if I hung it around my neck (as a friend suggested) I would be unable to stand upright.

I did not care for my grandfather’s aesthetic. He was, in my hotheaded teenaged opinion, far too shiny far too much of the time. What with the gold decorations, the rayon camp shirts, and the Brilliantine that glued his remaining hair to his skull, he sparkled like the top of the Chrysler Building at dawn. A bit much, I thought, for a quiet, middle-class life in the Detroit suburbs.

Then I grew to manhood. And though my own gold chains and charms (all childhood gifts from grandpa’s side of the family) sit untouched next to that enormous ring, I have discovered that I, the little bauble, have not fallen far from the gewgaw tree.

The only difference is where I put the decorations.

My weakness? Cuff links.

Oh, sweet sainted Harry Winston how I do love cuff links. My collection is ridiculous.

fwf-51-cufflinks-box
No, that’s not all of them. Not even close.

I wear them, yes. I but I don’t wear them absolutely every day; and even if I did, no person needs this many cuff links. It’s not as though they wear out frequently. And most cuffed shirts come with, you know, buttons. Buttons are far more convenient. Buttons are practical. Buttons make sense.

Yet I keep on buying cuff links.

The Perfect Motif

Not that I buy indiscriminately. Heavens, no. Aside from the potentially catastrophic drain on my bank balance, the most frustrating thing about the cuff link obsession is that modern jewelers assume men want links reflecting one of these lifestyles:

• golfing,
• horse racing,
• duck hunting,
• yachting,
• private aviation,
• high-stakes poker,
• drug trafficking.

These do not appeal to me, but the cuff link world tips heavily to designs incorporating golf tees, horseshoes, mallards, anchors, propellers, aces and spades, and huge weird agglomerations of colored rhinestones stuck in large chunks of all that glitters but is not gold.

No, thank you.

When I do find a set that expresses Who I Am as a Cuff Link Wearer, I snatch it right up. For example, florals. I love flowers. These anonymous Art Nouveau snowdrops were in a jar in a Seattle antiques mall. I got ’em for less than twenty bucks.

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And these beanies? A gift, from a friend whose husband wore them for years on the bench as a judge. I may ask to be buried in them.

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Those are propellers I can dig. (And they spin!)

Do It Yourself

I am delighted to find that some of the paraphernalia of traditional American and European menswear is making a comeback. There are burgeoning cuff link collectors groups, and groups for men who like suits, and what-have-you.

Most manufacturers have yet to catch up with the modern diversity of tastes, though. So it’s a relief and a pleasure to learn that if you have access to a supplier like Makers’ Mercantile, which carries the full line of Skacel Buttons, you can quite easily make handsome, fun cuff links that speak to those outside the horsie-duckie-boaty set.

There are many ways to go about making cufflinks from buttons. I’m going to show two in this column. Both methods are accessible to people who are not otherwise deeply into making jewelry, and who haven’t got any special jewelry-making equipment at home.

First, though, let’s have a look at a few buttons.

The Button Line-Up

Makers’ Mercantile’s button selection is famously rich; they carry all the lines of Skacel Buttons, as well as other fine makers. The materials are as varied as glass, antler, coconut, enamel, horn, plastic, shell, and wood.

For these cuff links, we want shank buttons–buttons which attach to fabric by integral loops on the back…

fwf-51-shanksshowing

… rather than holes through the body of the button.

It took me hours, but I narrowed my choices to these:

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Glass: Circling Flowers, 18 mm

Available Here.

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Picture Buttons: Comic, 18mm

Available Here.

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Enamel: Yin & Yang Cats, 18mm

Available Here.

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Metal: Acorn and Leaves, Antique Silver finish, 15 mm

Available Here.

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Enamel: Skull, Black Gun Metal Shank, 15mm

Available Here.

Method One: Two-Button (Double-Sided) Links

Two-button links require, as the name suggests, two buttons for each cuff. They are double-sided, meaning the finished link is decorative on both sides. They are not only extra handsome, they’re also best for shank buttons whose shanks are difficult or impossible to remove.

fwf-51-toolsandbuttons
Pliers (left) and Nippers (right)

To make them, you’ll need:

• four shank buttons, matching or coordinating
• two four-inch lengths of 18-gauge craft wire
• wire nippers
• needle nose pliers

The buttons I chose for this method are from Skacel’s line of European glass. I could have ground or filed off the shanks (more about that in the next section), but there’s a risk of breakage. Also, I am deeply enamored of this design and wanted to multiply it by four.

 

Step 1. Slide the wire through the shank of the first button and, using the pliers, bend back half an inch of the wire.The first button is now loosely secured in place.

Note: 18-gauge wire is sturdy enough not to snap from normal use, but flexible enough that you won’t need brute strength to work with it. Most folks can easily bend and twist it with fingers, but pliers will make it easier to be precise.

fwf-51-dbl-step01

Step 2. Slide the other end of the wire through the shank of the second button, until the button rests against the cut end of the first bend.

fwf-51-dbl-step02

Step 3. Bend back the free end of the wire to loosely secure the second button.

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Step 4. With the pliers, gently coil the free end of the wire around and around the length of wire connecting the buttons, starting just past the shank of the second button. Continue to coil until you reach the shank of the first button.

fwf-51-dbl-step03b
Step 5. With the nippers, snip off the remainder of the wire.

Step 6. With the pliers, press the cut end of the wire into the coil to secure.

And there you have a double-sided cufflink.

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IMPORTANT NOTE. In this case, I am using four of the same button. But here’s a caveat: some buttons may be the right diameter to serve as links, but may also be too thick to easily fit through a ready-made buttonhole. That is, in fact, the case with these glass buttons.

Does it mean I can’t use these? Not at all. My preferred shirt brand is extra-generous with the buttonholes, so these will squeak through. But what I will likely do for ease of dressing is replace the second button with a smaller, coordinating button like this one, BR0971G14, which is 14mm rather than 18mm:

fwf-51-smallglassbutton
Then only the smaller button need pass through the holes. Combining a smaller button and a larger button looks perfectly fine, and does allow you (if you so desire) to use quite large and flashy buttons for the outside of your two-button link. That’s an especially fun way to dress up a plain blouse, by the way.

Method Two: Lever-Back Links

This is even simpler than method one. ‘

fwf-51-cufflinkblanks
cuff link blanks

You will need:

 

• two buttons, matching or coordinating
• two good-quality cuff link blanks, available from Makers’ Mercantile
• a metal file or a motorized grinding tool
• a hot glue gun
• safety glasses or goggles
• a small vise (if using motorized grinder)

First, we want to get rid of the button shanks.

Before we do that, keep in mind that we’re dealing with metal. Bits of it tend to fly off as we work. This isn’t difficult, and it’s nothing to be scared of. However, reasonable safety precautions are vital. First, eye protection: safety goggles or safety glasses.

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Second, do this only in area where you will not endanger others–keep pets, kids, nosy partners, etcetera, well away. A workshop, garage, or outdoor space is a best bet; and always do a thorough sweep/vacuum afterwards to remove all metal debris you create.

On all the metal-back buttons I selected, I was able to easily snip off the shanks…

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…using a pair of standard, inexpensive wire nippers–easily procured from a hardware dealer, and likely already sitting in your toolbox if you have one.

Post clipping, all the buttons still had vestigial nubbins on the back.

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To make a really nice set of links, we want to remove the nubbins and create a completely flat surface.

There are two options. The first works perfectly well, but takes a little longer. Use a metal file…

fwf-51-handheld
…and file away by hand until the nubbins are gone. It takes less time than you think.

Or, if you have a little motorized helper like a Dremel, you can pop in a metal-grinding attachment (this is Dremel Head 8193)…

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…and use it to grind off the nubs after you have placed the button securely in a vise…

fwf-51-vise

…which I like to drape with a piece of scrap cloth or (better) a thin rubber pad to avoid scraping the finish on the public side of the button.

fwf-51-drapedvise
After grinding, give the button a minute to cool down completely before you take it out of the vise.

It should go without saying, but I’ll say it anyway: Do not ever attempt to grind the back of a button with a motorized tool while holding the button in your hand. 

With the back of your buttons nice and smooth, fetch your cuff link blanks and your hot glue gun.

fwf-51-gluegun
pew pew pew

Apply a nice blob of hot glue to the pad on the blank, spreading it out a bit but keeping away from the edges…

fwf-51-hotglue

…and immediately press it against the center back of the button.

The glue will set quickly, but let the piece sit and harden for a good 30 minutes before you try to put it on. If you find any stray “hairs” of glue showing, they’re easy to pick off before you give the link a final buff with a clean cloth.

Should you mess up, by the way–say, you don’t put the two surfaces together quite quickly enough and they won’t stick–it’s possible to pick off the dry glue and try again. Ask me how I know.

 

Cuff Link Giving Guide

In less than an hour, I found myself with multiple new, cute sets of cuff links–all of them slick enough for me to wear in a dressy setting. I can’t keep them all, sadly, so I’ve been thinking about who else might like to have them.

Zap! Splat!

fwf-51-zapsplatlinks
Suited To: Comic Book Fans, Gamers, Superheroes, Illustrators, Stylish Street Fighters

Skulls

fwf-51-skulllinks
Suited To: Undertakers, Horror Fans, Bikers, Anatomy Professors, Goth Bankers, The Undead

Kitties

fwf-51-kittycufflinks
Suited To: Cat People, People with Cats, Cat Fanciers, Most Knitters You Will Ever Know, Veterinarians

Oak Leaf and Acorns

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Suited To: Academics, Botanists, Lumberjacks, Tree Surgeons, Squirrels, Piglet

Next Time…

I put away the glue gun, roll up my sleeves, and try to figure out what to do when Makers’ Mercantile sends me this.

fwf-51-rwb-teaser
See you in two weeks.

Tools and Materials Appearing in This Issue

Glass Shiny Black Circling Flowers Buttons, 14 and 18 mm
Skacel Buttons Enamel Yin & Yang Cats, Black and White, 18mm
Skacel Buttons Enamel Skull, Black Gun Metal Shank, 15mm
Skacel Buttons Metal Acorn and Leaves, 15mm
Skacel Buttons Picture Comic Buttons, 18mm (shown in Zap! and Splat!; also available in Bang!, Bonk!, Kapow!, and Thwack!)
Cuff Link Blanks

About Franklin

Designer, teacher, author and illustrator Franklin Habit is the author of It Itches: A Stash of Knitting Cartoons (Interweave Press, 2008). His newest book, I Dream of Yarn: A Knit and Crochet Coloring Book was brought out by Soho Publishing in May 2016 and is in its second printing.

He travels constantly to teach knitters at shops and guilds across the country and internationally; and has been a popular member of the faculties of such festivals as Vogue Knitting Live!, STITCHES Events, the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival, Squam Arts Workshops, the Taos Wool Festival, Sock Summit, and the Madrona Fiber Arts Winter Retreat.

Franklin’s varied experience in the fiber world includes contributions of writing and design to Vogue KnittingYarn Market News, Interweave KnitsInterweave CrochetPieceWorkTwist Collective; and a regular columns and cartoons for Mason-Dixon Knitting, PLY Magazine, Lion Brand Yarns, and Skacel Collection/Makers’ Mercantile. Many of his independently published designs are available via Ravelry.com.

He is the longtime proprietor of The Panopticon, one of the most popular knitting blogs on the Internet (presently on hiatus).

Franklin lives in Chicago, Illinois, cohabiting shamelessly with 15,000 books, a Schacht spinning wheel, four looms, and a colony of yarn that multiplies whenever his back is turned.

Follow Franklin online via Twitter (@franklinhabit), Instagram (@franklin.habit), his Web site (franklinhabit.com) or his Facebook page.